KNIT

KNIT

Knitwear is a delicate piece of art. Yet, taking good care of it is a lot simpler than it seems. Follow the steps below and wear your piece season after season.

Knitwear is a delicate piece of art. Yet, taking good care of it is a lot simpler than it seems. Follow the steps below and wear your piece season after season.


CARE

  • Some knitwear does not like water, so always check the instructions on the care label as it may contain specific information, such as the need for professional textile care.
  • Knitwear does not need to be washed after every wear. We recommend washing it as little as possible and airing it out instead. A further good tip is to wear a T-shirt under your knitwear to absorb the sweat.
  • We recommend turning garments inside out before washing them so they look and feel good for longer.
  • Depending on the material, knitwear is more or less sensitive. While cotton is less sensitive and can be washed at 30° Celsius, wool should be washed cold on a gentle handwash cycle or wool programme. Cashmere should be washed as little as possible, using a short handwash cycle or wool programme, with a half-full load. Consider taking your cashmere garments to a professional dry cleaner. For both wool and cashmere you should always use a small amount of mild detergent and a gentle spin cycle (up to a maximum of 600 rpm).
  • Always flat dry your knitwear to keep the shape. Carefully roll your knitwear in a towel and press it gently to remove excess water before drying. We recommend you dry your garment lying flat on a towel on your drying rack. Do not stretch the garment. Shape your knitwear the way you want it to look when it is dry.
  • In most cases, ironing is not needed for knitwear, however, if chosen, iron very gently on the reverse side. Do not press the pile of knitwear, this will flatten the structure. Use a damp cloth. Use the wool setting on your iron, with plenty of steam.
  • Proper storage is essential. You should keep your knit in a clean and stable environment; choose a relatively dry place (30-40% humidity), with minimal exposure to light. If woven wool garments are hung on hangers, this will result in the fabric stretching over time due to the weight, consequently misshaping. Before you retire your knitwear for the warmer months, make sure it is clean, pressed and folded neatly.
  • In case you find moth holes put your sweaters in the freezer for 48 hours, to kill the moth eggs. Wash your knitwear after freezing it.
  • Pilling is quite normal and does not mean your knitwear is poor quality. Most of the times, pilling is caused by friction. Before washing your knit piece, we recommend using a pilling comb to de-pill your knitwear of those bobbles. Following the length of the garment, draw the comb gently but firmly over the affected area. Once they are removed, wash as instructed.



CHARACTERISTICS

  • Beautiful construction
  • Soft texture
  • Flexible
  • Moisture permeability
  • Close-fitting



ORIGIN

Knitted fabrics are more flexible than woven ones and can be readily constructed into smaller pieces. There are two basic varieties of knit: weft-knit and warp-knit fabric. The former is easier to make and more common. When cut, it unravels unless repaired. The latter includes tricot and Milanese, which are resistant to runs. Different stitches and stitch combinations allow for beautiful patterns to result and affect the properties of knitted fabrics.


CARE

  • Some knitwear does not like water, so always check the instructions on the care label as it may contain specific information, such as the need for professional textile care.
  • Knitwear does not need to be washed after every wear. We recommend washing it as little as possible and airing it out instead. A further good tip is to wear a T-shirt under your knitwear to absorb the sweat.
  • We recommend turning garments inside out before washing them so they look and feel good for longer.
  • Depending on the material, knitwear is more or less sensitive. While cotton is less sensitive and can be washed at 30° Celsius, wool should be washed cold on a gentle handwash cycle or wool programme. Cashmere should be washed as little as possible, using a short handwash cycle or wool programme, with a half-full load. Consider taking your cashmere garments to a professional dry cleaner. For both wool and cashmere you should always use a small amount of mild detergent and a gentle spin cycle (up to a maximum of 600 rpm).
  • Always flat dry your knitwear to keep the shape. Carefully roll your knitwear in a towel and press it gently to remove excess water before drying. We recommend you dry your garment lying flat on a towel on your drying rack. Do not stretch the garment. Shape your knitwear the way you want it to look when it is dry.
  • In most cases, ironing is not needed for knitwear, however, if chosen, iron very gently on the reverse side. Do not press the pile of knitwear, this will flatten the structure. Use a damp cloth. Use the wool setting on your iron, with plenty of steam.
  • Proper storage is essential. You should keep your knit in a clean and stable environment; choose a relatively dry place (30-40% humidity), with minimal exposure to light. If woven wool garments are hung on hangers, this will result in the fabric stretching over time due to the weight, consequently misshaping. Before you retire your knitwear for the warmer months, make sure it is clean, pressed and folded neatly.
  • In case you find moth holes put your sweaters in the freezer for 48 hours, to kill the moth eggs. Wash your knitwear after freezing it.
  • Pilling is quite normal and does not mean your knitwear is poor quality. Most of the times, pilling is caused by friction. Before washing your knit piece, we recommend using a pilling comb to de-pill your knitwear of those bobbles. Following the length of the garment, draw the comb gently but firmly over the affected area. Once they are removed, wash as instructed.



CHARACTERISTICS

  • Beautiful construction
  • Soft texture
  • Flexible
  • Moisture permeability
  • Close-fitting



ORIGIN

Knitted fabrics are more flexible than woven ones and can be readily constructed into smaller pieces. There are two basic varieties of knit: weft-knit and warp-knit fabric. The former is easier to make and more common. When cut, it unravels unless repaired. The latter includes tricot and Milanese, which are resistant to runs. Different stitches and stitch combinations allow for beautiful patterns to result and affect the properties of knitted fabrics.

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